News


  • Questions and Answers from Our County Board of Health

    Posted: Mar 16, 2020
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    What will our response be to citizens on what needs to be done if they experience symptoms of COVID-19? We cannot stress enough the importance of social distancing if citizens are sick. Close contact is defined as— a) being within approximately 6 feet (2 meters) of a COVID-19 case for a prolonged period of time; close contact can occur while caring for, living with, visiting, or sharing a health care waiting area or room with a COVID-19 case – or – b) having direct contact with infectious secretions of a COVID-19 case (e.g., being coughed on) Some helpful tips: Please take necessary precautions in how we all can be proactive in preventing the spread of disease. Cover your coughs and sneezes Cover: Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Dispose: Throw used tissues in a lined trash can. Wash hands: Immediately wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or, if soap and water are not available, clean your hands with an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Clean your hands often Wash hands: Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing; going to the bathroom; and before eating or preparing food. Hand sanitizer: If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol, covering all surfaces of your hands and rubbing them together until they feel dry. Soap and water: Soap and water are the best option if hands are visibly dirty. Avoid touching: Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands. Avoid sharing personal household items Do not share: You should not share dishes, drinking glasses, cups, eating utensils, towels, or bedding with other people or pets in your home. Wash thoroughly after use: After using these items, they should be washed thoroughly with soap and water. Clean all “high-touch” surfaces everyday Clean and disinfect: Practice routine cleaning of high touch surfaces. High touch surfaces include counters, tabletops, doorknobs, bathroom fixtures, toilets, phones, keyboards, tablets, and bedside tables. Disinfect areas with bodily fluids: Also, clean any surfaces that may have blood, stool, or body fluids on them. Household cleaners: Use a household cleaning spray or wipe, according to the label instructions. Labels contain instructions for safe and effective use of the cleaning product including precautions you should take when applying the product, such as wearing gloves and making sure you have good ventilation during use of the product. Monitor your symptoms Seek medical attention: Seek prompt medical attention if your illness is worsening (e.g., difficulty breathing). Call your doctor: Before seeking care, call your healthcare provider and tell them that you have, or are being evaluated for, COVID-19. Wear a facemask when sick: Put on a facemask before you enter the facility. These steps will help the healthcare provider’s office to keep other people in the office or waiting room from getting infected or exposed. Pets and animals Limit contact with pets and animals: Although there have not been reports of pets or other animals becoming sick with COVID-19, it is still recommended that people sick with COVID-19 limit contact with animals until more information is known about the virus. When possible, have another member of your household care for your animals while you are sick. If you are sick with COVID-19, avoid contact with your pet, including petting, snuggling, being kissed or licked, and sharing food. If you must care for your pet or be around animals while you are sick, wash your hands before and after you interact with pets and wear a facemask. See COVID-19 and Animals for more information. Where should they go for testing, treatment, etc to have the least impact on others who are not sick? Citizens will not be tested upon request at this time, but instead must meet certain criteria set forth by the CDC to warrant such testing. Local Public Health cannot make the decision to private providers to test potential cases. Those decisions are made at the State level with PCPs or healthcare providers contacting 1-800-PUB-HLTH and consulting with a Medical Epidemiologist. If symptomatic, all citizens should call ahead before visiting their doctor. This will help healthcare providers take steps to keep other people from getting infected or exposed. Also, if sick, a facemask should be worn if around other people (e.g., sharing a room or vehicle). Equally important, caregivers should wear a mask, especially if patients cannot (perhaps, masking causes trouble breathing for the patient). What is Burke’s plan? Local public health will continue to follow guidelines set forth by the CDC. Should a potential case be confirmed as positive in Burke County, a contact investigation will be coordinated among State, District, and Local teams.

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  • Every.One.Counts

    Posted: Mar 13, 2020
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  • The Census has Started!

    Posted: Mar 12, 2020
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    Census Dates
    Census Dates

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  • Every.One.Counts #BurkeCounts!

    Posted: Mar 12, 2020
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  • Every.One.Counts

    Posted: Mar 10, 2020
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  • Road Closures as of March 9th

    Posted: Mar 09, 2020
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    The following roads are closed until further notice. Please notify all personnel of these listings to assist with emergency calls and bus routes. Henry Berol Road 0.50 Mile West of Middle Ground Road; Chance Hatcher From Rosedale Road to Hatchers Mill Road; Hillis Circle 0.50 Mile South of Joyner-Oglesby Road; South College Road 0.67 Mile North of Thornton Road; Middle Ground Road 0.62 Mile South of Henry Berol Road; Walden Pond Road Between Gough Spur Road and SR 80 West; Tarver Road 1.00 Mile South of SR 80 West; Harvey Road 1.50 Miles West of Susie Bailey Road; Old Wadley Road From SR 17 to Midville City Limits

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  • 2020 Census Invitations Arrive March 12-20

    Posted: Mar 09, 2020
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    MARCH 6, 2020 — Ninety-five percent or about 143 million households in the country will receive an initial invitation to respond to the 2020 Census in their mailboxes between March 12 and 20. The U.S. Census Bureau released informational copies today of the invitations, the enclosed materials, and the subsequent reminders households will receive. These materials can help the public know what to expect and avoid potential scams. Households are encouraged to respond when they receive their invitation. Depending on how likely the area is to respond online, households will receive either an invitation encouraging them to respond online or by phone (about 112 million households), or an invitation along with a paper questionnaire (about 31 million households). All invitations will include a short phrase in English and 12 additional languages inviting people to respond online or by phone in their language. In areas where 20 percent or more of the households need Spanish assistance, the invitations will be in both English and Spanish. All households receiving an invitation in the mail will receive a second letter in the mail shortly after reminding them to respond. Then, households that still haven’t responded will receive a series of additional reminders, including a paper questionnaire in mid-April. Census takers will follow up with households that don’t respond to collect responses in person.

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